Tag Archives: Piccadilly Gardens

Manchester Citi Bus 103 in Piccadilly

30 Oct
Manchester Citi bus in Piccadilly. Image courtesy of J. Shaw.

Manchester Citi bus in Piccadilly with Sunley Piazza in the background. Image courtesy of J. Shaw.

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Manchester Corporation Bus 1940s

30 Oct
Manchester Corporation bus in Piccadilly in the 1940s. Image courtesy of J. Shaw.

Manchester Corporation bus in Piccadilly in the 1940s. Image courtesy of J. Shaw.

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Manchester Tram 173

30 Oct
Tram 173 c1910. Image courtesy D. Boothman.

Tram 173 c1910. Image courtesy D. Boothman.

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Manchester Tram 618

29 Oct
Tram 618 in Piccadilly. Image courtesy D. Boothman.

Tram 618 in Piccadilly. Image courtesy D. Boothman.

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The Once Green Oasis of Manchester

2 Sep

This is a postcard of Piccadilly Gardens from 1949 viewed from Portland Street. Courtesy of R.Jones.

This is a postcard of Piccadilly Gardens in 1949 viewed from Portland Street. The printer or maker is unknown.

Piccadilly Gardens after Tadao Ando’s design and development. Courtesy of P. Stanley.

For most Mancunians, Piccadilly Gardens has traditionally been the centre of Manchester. This is due to Piccadilly Gardens being at the centre of public transport and also as it is a rare and much treasured green oasis in and amongst all the stone and brick and in 2012 concrete that enwraps it.

Unlike London which developed many large and impressive inner city parks, the relentless march of industry in Manchester throughout the 18th and 19th century saw most of Manchester’s inner city green space decimated and torn up to be replaced with factories, mills and warehouses. Buildings of round-the-clock toil and sweat, commerce and business and billowing chimneys; the pillars of industry that once proliferated the landscape and drove and transformed Manchester into world renowned metropolis of cotton – Cottonopolis has it was known worldwide.

Within this transformation, where once green space and open fields were plentiful, land was now carved up and sold off to industrialists and men of ambition. This was the birth of the modern city and the defining separation from the countryside where our ancestors had worked and lived their lives for centuries.
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