Culcheth Rose Queen of 1950

22 Feb
Culcheth Rose Queen Day 1950. Courtesy Margaret Cowan-Young.

Culcheth Rose Queen Day 1950. Image courtesy Margaret Young (Cowan).

Culcheth Rose Queen Day 1950. Courtesy Margaret Cowan-Young.

Culcheth Rose Queen Day 1950. Image courtesy Margaret Young (Cowan) .

This is a photograph of the Culcheth Rose Queen Day in 1950, taken in Culcheth Hall.

Culcheth Hall in the background and its boundary wall in the foreground in 1909.

Culcheth Hall in the background and its boundary wall in the foreground in 1909. Image courtesy D. Dillon.

Culcheth Hall stood to the east of Culcheth Lane, alongside the River Medlock in township of Newton (later Newton Heath) and was owned by the Byron family (of which the major Romantic poet Lord Byron was a member).

The Byron family owned among other properties, the nearby 15th century moated Clayton Hall, currently owned by Manchester City Council. The Grade II* building is maintained by the voluntary group, Friends of Clayton Park

15th century Clayton Hall.

15th century Clayton Hall. Image courtesy P. Stanley.

Little Sisters of the Poor (aka Little Sisters), originally a Roman Catholic religious institute for women, ran a Home for the Aged from Culcheth Hall, known as St. Mary’s. It closed in 1972 and was demolished (do you know the date?) some time after.

The Little Sisters had been at Culcheth Hall since at least the 4th May 1897, when they obtained certification for Culcheth Hall as a place of worship. Culcheth Hall ceased to be a place of worship on 8th October 1976 under the Places of Religious Worship Certifying Act 1852 and Places of Worship Registration Act 1855.

There is still one house of the order remaining in Manchester called St Joseph’s Nursing Home on Plymouth Grove West in Longsight. It was at St Joseph’s that the Little Sisters first started in Manchester.

Keeley Close. Image courtesy of J. Shaw.

Keeley Close in Newton Heath. Image courtesy J. Shaw.

Today, the functional modernist units of Keeley Close sit on the site of Culcheth Hall, with only part of the boundary wall to the south side remaining.

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