Newton Silk Mill – Holyoak St – Newton Heath – Manchester – M40 1HA

29 Sep

Newton Silk Mill on Holyoak Street in Newton Heath in 2011. Courtesy G. Hampson.

The 1830s was a period of great change in England, in particular with the passing of first  Reform Act which helped radically reapportion parliamentary representation in particular to the booming North of England and gave greater voting rights to the common man. After which 1 in 5 now had the right to vote.

Newton Heath Silk Mill seen from Newton Street in 2011. Courtesy G. Hampson.

Newton Heath in North Manchester was also going through great change and  Newton Silk Mill which was built in 1832 in pink brick with sandstone lintels, stands prominently on Holyoak Street as testament to the great shift towards the total industrialisation of Manchester and how with the arrival of the textile mills in Newton Heath further transformed a once thriving and largely home-based cottage industry to a fully mechanised and mass-produced silk spinning system and in the process shifting production from small cottages within a rural landscape to large mills and warehouses that dominated an increasingly urban environment.

Whilst cotton was king for many mills in the 18c, 19c and 20th century, notably Manchester became world famous for cotton trading; a metropolis commonly referred to as Cottonopolis. However,  there were still technological advances in silk spinning and continued to be an alternative to cotton throughout the 19th century.

Silk spinning stopped a long time ago at the Grade II listed Newton Silk Mill and is now home to North Manchester Primary Care Trust, but it remains as a rare architectural monument to Newton Heath‘s early origins and how industrialisation and urbanisation radically changed  the area for ever.

If you would like to add any further information, memories, pictures or stories regarding the post, HistoryME would love to hear from you.

Please contact us by using the form below:

If you would like to add any further information, memories, pictures or stories regarding this post, HistoryME would love to hear from you.

Please contact us by using the form below:

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