Archive | September, 2011

Newton Silk Mill – Holyoak St – Newton Heath – Manchester – M40 1HA

29 Sep

Newton Silk Mill on Holyoak Street in Newton Heath in 2011. Courtesy G. Hampson.

The 1830s was a period of great change in England, in particular with the passing of first  Reform Act which helped radically reapportion parliamentary representation in particular to the booming North of England and gave greater voting rights to the common man. After which 1 in 5 now had the right to vote.

Newton Heath Silk Mill seen from Newton Street in 2011. Courtesy G. Hampson.

Newton Heath in North Manchester was also going through great change and  Newton Silk Mill which was built in 1832 in pink brick with sandstone lintels, stands prominently on Holyoak Street as testament to the great shift towards the total industrialisation of Manchester and how with the arrival of the textile mills in Newton Heath further transformed a once thriving and largely home-based cottage industry to a fully mechanised and mass-produced silk spinning system and in the process shifting production from small cottages within a rural landscape to large mills and warehouses that dominated an increasingly urban environment.

Whilst cotton was king for many mills in the 18c, 19c and 20th century, notably Manchester became world famous for cotton trading; a metropolis commonly referred to as Cottonopolis. However,  there were still technological advances in silk spinning and continued to be an alternative to cotton throughout the 19th century.

Silk spinning stopped a long time ago at the Grade II listed Newton Silk Mill and is now home to North Manchester Primary Care Trust, but it remains as a rare architectural monument to Newton Heath‘s early origins and how industrialisation and urbanisation radically changed  the area for ever.

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Culcheth Methodist Church – Droylsden Rd – Newton Heath – M40 1PW

27 Sep

Culcheth Methodist Church built in 1972 shown here in 2011.

This is Culcheth Methodist Church which was built in 1972 to replace the previous church which was built in 1877 and demolished in 1972.

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Droylsden Rd – Newton Heath – 1908

26 Sep

Droylsden Road in Newton Heath in 1908.

This is a photograph showing Droylsden Road in Newton Heath around 1908. The church in the middle of the picture is the Culcheth Methodist Church which was built in 1877, until it was demolished in 1972.

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Ancoats Hospital “Sustainable Community Brought To Life In Manchester” Press Release

26 Sep

New Islington Press Release 25th Janaury 2005

This is a extract from a press release for the New Islington ‘regeneration’ project from 25th January, 2005.

The extract details how Urban Splash intended to refurbish the listed Ancoats Hospital and Dispensary with building work starting in the Spring of 2005.

The press release also mentions how the New Islington Regeneration Project aimed to build a new community with improved services and ensure sustainable change.

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Pocket Watch – K.D. Sykes – Ancoats – Manchester – 1862

16 Sep

Front.

This is a solid silver slow-beat pocket watch made by K.D. Sykes of 156 Great Ancoats Street in 1862.

BACK


The watch is known as an English Fusee pocket watch, so named because of the cone shaped component of the watch. The slow-beat refers to half seconds rather than the standard 1 second increments of modern watches.

The pinions of ten refers to the pinion which is a round gear and the ten is the amount of revolutions before the little hand moves.

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Street Performer – Castlefield – 1980s

14 Sep

Street performer in Castlefield in the 1980s.

This is a picture of a street performer in Castlefield in the 1980s.

The performer is dressed in Victorian clothes and is paying tribute to the organ grinders, who were novelty acts who provided popular street entertainment in the 1800s and early 1900s, cranking a hand organ or “hurdy gurdy”, whilst a monkey would perform tricks and collect money from passers-by.

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Golden Jubilee Celebrations – Newton Heath – 1923

14 Sep

Golden Jubilee Celebrations in Newton Heath, 1923.

This is a postcard showing the Golden Jubilee celebrations of 1923 in Newton Heath, held at an unknown church in the area, by The Right Reverend Lord Abbot Seadon.

The postcard was by B.L. Pearson who was also based in the area at this time.

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Smithfield Market – Shude Hill – 1900

14 Sep

Shudehill Market in 1900.


This is picture of Smithfield Market in 1900, Smithfield Market was in the Shude Hill area and close to the centre of Manchester.

The market in its heyday in the late 19th/ early 20th Century was reputed to be the largest market in Europe and continued until it was finally closed in 1972, only to reopen the following year in Openshaw as New Smithfield Wholesale Market, where it remains today.

The history of markets in Manchester can be traced back to William the Conqueror’s invasion of Britain in 1066, for which the Manor of Manchester was given the right under law to hold markets and fairs.

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Postcard – Edge Lane – Chorlton-Cum-Hardy – c1910

14 Sep

Postcard – Edge Lane – Chorlton-Cum-Hardy – c1910. Courtesy A. Lyon.

This is a postcard showing Edge Lane in Chorlton-Cum-Hardy around 1910. To the left hand side of the postcard are the grounds of St Clement’s Church. The picture shows where High Lane turns into Edge Lane.

Kind thanks to Mr J Thornley for his contributions to this post.

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Manchester FA Cup Football Centenary Medal – 1972

13 Sep

Detail of medal showing the Manchester City badge.


This is a Football Association medal given to Manchester City in 1972 to celebrate 100 years of the F.A. Cup.

The medal measures 2.7cm in diameter.

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